Bird Weekly Challenge #15: Birds with Green Feathers

Painted Buntings and Ruby Throated Hummingbirds are two of my favorite back yard birds. I’ve seen them daily for the last few days and managed to get a few captures of these gorgeous birds.

Female Painted Bunting in Wax Myrtle
Male Ruby Throated Hummingbird

Thank you Lisa. for this Bird Weekly challenge. Her original post is Bird Weekly Challenge #15 – Birds with Green Feathers.

Lens-Artists #114: Negative Space

This week’s photo challenge from Amy asks us to show negative space. The negative space in a photo is the space surrounding the main subject in an image. This negative space can add a sense of emptiness, calm, peacefulness, or isolation.

In the photo above, the little dachshund is the main subject of this image. Our eye is drawn beyond the dog where we see he is running towards a flock of brown pelicans on a deserted beach.

In the next two photos, I felt the isolation of some very remote areas in the United States.

Driving through the Big Sky country of Montana toward the Bighorn Mountains
On this remote section of the Alaska Highway we were the only vehicle for miles

I like to use negative space to surround the main subject when taking closeup photos in the garden.

Monarch butterfly on milkweed

Thanks to Amy for this week’s Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #114 – Negative Space.

Bird Weekly Challenge #14: Flocks

For this week’s Bird Weekly Challenge Lisa has asked us to show flocks of birds. The above image is of a flock of Roseate Spoonbills on the Texas Gulf Coast.

Flock of Great Egrets with two Spoonbills in Everglades National Park
Flock of Brown Pelicans in Coastal Georgia
Flocks of nesting Egrets and Wood Storks at Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia

Thanks you Lisa. for this challenge. Her original post is Bird Weekly Challenge #14 – Flocks

Lens-Artists #113: Labor of Love

This week’s photo challenge comes from guest host Rusha Sams of Oh, The Places we See… We are asked to show images that represent a Labor of Love.

Planting my butterfly garden and maintaining it is a labor of love for me. By planting seeds and plants that attract pollinators such as butterflies and bees I am providing a place for them to feast on the nectar. At the same time I have a space in my backyard to relax and enjoy nature.

Here’s a few of the late summer critters that visited the garden recently. You can click on a picture to enlarge it.

Monarchs, Gulf Fritillaries, and Skipper butterflies have been all over the zinnias and Mexican Sunflower drinking up the nectar. Wasps, bees, and even a tiny grasshopper enjoyed the flowers, too.

It’s been a long, hot, dry summer and hopefully the flowers will continue to attract the butterflies and other critters for a little while longer.

I smile whenever I see these beautiful visitors to the garden. What made you smile this week?

Thanks to guest host Rusha Sams for this week’s Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #113 – A Labor of Love.

Also shared with Trent’s Weekly Smile.

Bird Weekly Challenge #12: Seagulls

Seagulls are common here on the Georgia coast. Whether I’m at the beach, riding in the boat, or sitting on my back deck I am likely to see some seagulls. They are so common I hardly even notice them and rarely photograph them. The gull at the top of the page is a ring-billed gull I spotted on the beach one winter.

When the shrimpers clean their nets, seagulls come by for an easy meal
Laughing Gulls are frequently seen where I live in Georgia, but I captured these on the Mississippi Gulf Coast

Thanks you Lisa. for this challenge. Her original post is Bird Weekly Challenge #12 – Seagulls